Bindaas: Moreish Modern Indian Food [New Restaurant Review]

Hong Kong is home to a fairly large selection of Indian restaurants that offer the classics, such as chicken tikka, palak paneer, vindaloo, and so forth. With little to distinctly separate one restaurant from the other, it’s no wonder that most seem to glide under the foodie radar. Thankfully, that’s all about to change with a fresh face for Indian food: Bindaas. Serving traditional street foods and Indian tapas with a modern flare, Bindaas is a unique restaurant option for those looking for something different.

Restaurant

Bindaas

Colloquial Hindi for “chilled out” or “carefree”, Bindaas brings an innovative approach to Indian cuisine in Hong Kong. Both the interior and Chef Mrigank Singh’s food is reflective of this unpretentious modernity. The decor incorporates a mix of bold, eye-popping patterns entwined in a laid-back space. This blend of time-honored yet modern decor and atmosphere creates a casual and hip dining experience.

Drinks

Desi Lass
Desi Lass

The drink menu at Bindaas places focus on custom built Indian-inspired cocktails, which will not disappoint. As big fans of the traditional lassi, we simply could not resist the Desi Lass ($85 HKD), made with vodka, yogurt, fresh mint, and vanilla. This cocktail was was incredibly easy and enjoyable to drink; great to pair with spicy dishes. We tried an assortment of other cocktails as well, each of which were equally as good as the last.

Street Corner

NaanZa
NaanZa
Bombay Style 'Pao'
Bombay Style ‘Pao’

Dinner began with two dishes from the “Street Corner” section of the menu. The Chili Chicken NaanZa ($118 HKD), a fusion of naan and pizza with a ‘Makhani’ tomato gravy, was a first for most of us at the table. All of the bold flavours from the toppings were apparent thanks to thin “crust” of the NaanZa. Moving onto a slightly more traditional-looking dish was the Bombay Style ‘Pao’ with Keema ($108 HKD). The minced goat meat masala had a thick consistency, which was great by itself, however, when paired with the bread  it was a bit too heavy for our liking.

Chaat

Sev Puri
Sev Puri

Chaat typically refers to roadside snacks from food stalls and carts throughout India and other nearby countries. Bindaas has brought this local concept to Hong Kong, while still keeping its authenticity. The Sev Puri ($68 HKD) was a textured treat with its crunchy shell, boiled potatoes, chutney, and fried chickpea ‘micro noodles’.

Small Plates

Do Phool Ek Tandoor
Do Phool Ek Tandoor
Mutton Shami Kebab
Mutton Shami Kebab

The Do Phool Ek Tandoor ($98 HKD) didn’t last long on the table, as the clay oven baked yogurt marinated broccoli and cauliflower were greedily devoured. While the presentation of all other dishes thus far were impressive, we were slightly disappointed with the Mutton Shami Kebab ($148 HKD). In terms of taste, the 12 hours cooked goat leg and baby chickpea patties weren’t anything to write home about either.

Curries

Bindaas Chicken Tikka Masala
Bindaas Chicken Tikka Masala

Putting a modern twist on most of their curries, like the Bindaas Chicken Tikka Masala ($148 HKD), made them stand out from the crowd (and the trendy red dishware used certainly helped). We were surprised to learn that Chef Mrigank Singh doesn’t use any cream in his curries, so you can indulge (almost) guilt-free knowing your curry isn’t as unhealthy as you thought. Thankfully, the lack of cream did not equal a lack of flavour, however, there were a few comments at our table about the need for more spice in the curries. A testament to the mild spice was how we easily ate the Vindaloo without our throats feeling like they were on fire.

Dessert

Masala Chai
Masala Chai
Malai Kulfi Cubes
Malai Kulfi Cubes
Bindaas 'Paan' Cotta
Bindaas ‘Paan’ Cotta

Our absolute favourite part of dessert was the super cute presentation of the Masala Chai. To go along with our delicious drinks, we ordered two new Indian desserts most of us at the table had yet to try. We were surprised with the Malai Kulfi Cubes ($78 HKD) made with reduced saffron milk, chopped dry fruit, and rose syrup that came out in a martini glass. We clearly didn’t read the menu thoroughly, as we quickly realized that these cubes were frozen once we popped them into our mouths. Despite the cold shock, we did enjoy the subtle flavours and the interesting “dry ice” texture. As avid lovers of the traditional panna cotta, we were intrigued by the Bindaas ‘Paan’ Cotta ($78 HKD); simply put as their version of the original with paan flavour. The silky smooth texture was very appealing, however, it did have a pronounced floral aroma and taste, which might put some traditional dessert lovers off.

Verdict

If you’re tired of the same Indian restaurants around Hong Kong and are looking for something a bit more modern and unique, then Bindaas is a sure-fire hit. The food was satisfying both in terms of taste and aesthetics, however the price of some of the dishes seemed too high for what we received. One thing we did take notice of was when glancing around the restaurant, all other customers, aside from one couple, were of Indian descent, leading us to believe that Bindaas does serve truly authentic traditional dishes with a new-age twist.

Bindaas
33 Aberdeen Street 
Central 
Hong Kong 

+852 2447 9998

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