Test Kitchen: Melbourne’s Rice Paper Scissors pop-up

Although Hong Kong sees dozens of new restaurants pop up every month, they’re often wallet-draining and oh so disappointing. That’s exactly why I love the concept of Test Kitchen. Every month or so, Test Kitchen hosts global chefs from around the world for a few nights who cook up a storm for a hungry group of foodies. These chefs showcase a range of much-loved dishes from their restaurant and/or worldwide travels to other kitchens. This month’s collaboration was with Rice Paper Scissors, a South East Asian-inspired restaurant from Melbourne.

Vibe at Test Kitchen

Test Kitchen is located in a quiet area of Sai Ying Pun on Connaught Road. The venue is three stories high, the set-up is focused on communal dining with a large 10-person dining table on each floor), and the staff are incredibly warm and welcoming. The open kitchen is located on the second floor, so I’d recommend sitting there if you enjoy checking out what goes on behind the scenes. Vincent, the founder of Test Kitchen, really pours his passion for enjoying great food in a unique and fun way into this concept. That alone makes me want to come back again and again.

About Rice Paper Scissors

Rice Paper Scissors is one of Melbourne’s hottest restaurants and is based on the hawker dining bars of South East Asia with the concept of shared plates (they’re all about #useyourhands). Both Chef Ross Magnaye and owner Rahmie Clowes were at Test Kitchen to bring diners bold Asian fusion dishes strongly influenced by Ross’s Filipino background.

Starters

Kangaroo tartare
Market seafood with traditional condiments
Filipino ceviche ‘kinilaw’
Squid in its own ink

We began with Rock Paper Scissors’ famous kangaroo tartare. This was the first time I had ever tried kangaroo and it tasted similar to other game meat I’ve had before. The spices and seasoning were fresh, giving the meat a lighter taste. The market seafood with traditional condiments was a fresh way to start our meal and the sauces were delicious, though I  can’t say the dish was all that memorable. The Filipino ceviche ‘kinilaw’ was my favorite starter. the pickled vegetables added a slightly acidic taste, while the fermented coconut sauce helped give the dish a bit of sweetness to balance everything out. Finally, we had a bowl of very tender squid in its own ink with garlic and coconut vinegar. The mild flavor of this dish allowed us to truly appreciate the fresh squid on its own.

Mains

Davao style bbq chicken
Filipino style ‘caldereta’ (lamb shoulder)
Filipino ‘lechon kawali’ (pork belly)
Sides: salad, ‘pinakbet’ vegetable stew with okra

The davao style bbq chicken had an incredible flavor profile that tasted akin to the dressing often put on Vietnamese vermicelli noodles. Although I really did love the salad on top and the smokiness of the chicken, the texture of some of the pieces were a bit too tough to bite into. My favorite main was hands-down the Filipino style ‘caldereta’. This slow cooked lamb shoulder in a traditional rich tomato sauce was melt-in-your-mouth delicious. Unfortunately, we found the Filipino ‘lechon kawali’ (crispy pork belly roasted in Cebu-style spices) to be far too fatty for our liking. To accompany these main dishes, a bowl of rice, a garden salad, and ‘pinakbet’ vegetable stew with okra and pumpkin (a very traditional Filipino dish) were brought out as well.

Dessert

Mango float
Mama Riza’s rich peanut chocolate cake

Of the two desserts individually served, the mango float was by far my favorite. The fresh mango sat atop a layer of thick cream and was sprinkled with a peanut-like dust. The other dessert, Mama Riza’s rich peanut chocolate cake, was too dry for us to enjoy, although the dollop of custard underneath did help.

Verdict

If you’ve never been to a restaurant pop-up event before or have never been to one at Test Kitchen, I would highly recommend going. Not only do you get to try a range of dishes from a well-respected and popular restaurant from around the world, but the experience is unique and a tonne of fun. Most dinners sit around the HK$1000 mark, which includes 6 – 8 individual and/or sharing dishes and 3 – 4 alcoholic drinks. Be sure to check out Test Kitchen’s Facebook to see who will pop up next!

Test Kitchen
Shop 3, Kwan Yick Building 
158A Connaught Road West
Sai Ying Pun

Contact: info@testkitchen.com.hk

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